Veteran Saluting Flag

10 Memorial Day Facts To Put The Holiday In Perspective

Colorado Visiting Nurse Association remembers and honors the many military personnel who gave their lives in service to our country. We are a leading medical partner of the local VA to promote the health and wellness of all veterans. We are also a proud member of We Honor Veterans, a program of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO) in collaboration with the Department of Veterans Affairs that aims to accompany and guide veterans through their life stories toward a more peaceful ending.

 

Memorial Day

Memorial Day isn’t just an excuse to take a long weekend and loaf around eating grilled meats—although those are certainly among the reasons to love the holiday. Memorial Day is the day that Americans commemorate those who gave their lives while serving in our nation’s armed forces. 

Before taking off to enjoy the holiday, here are
10 Memorial Day Facts To Put The Holiday In Perspective:

1. Memorial Day wasn’t originally called Memorial Day. It was originally named Decoration Day. Flowers were placed on the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers to remember them and their sacrifice on the battlefield.

2. Originally, Memorial Day was designated to honor Civil War dead. Later it was changed to honor all Americans who had given their lives in the service of the country.

3. The first Decoration Day took place about one month after the end of the Civil War in 1865. In several states, the practice of placing flowers on the graves began in 1866. Although several towns lay claim to the holiday, in 1966, Waterloo, NY was designated the official birthplace of the holiday.

4. It is legally required to observe a National Moment of Remembrance on Memorial Day. In 2000, President Bill Clinton signed the act designating 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day as a National Moment of Remembrance.

5. Despite the many different Memorial Day customs, there are two common traditions observed everywhere:

  • The first is lowering the flag to half mast until noon and raising it to full mast until sundown.
  • The other tradition is playing Taps (as is done at military funerals).

6. Several Southern states also celebrate Confederate Memorial Day. The date of the celebration is different from state to state although most Southern states celebrate in either April or May.

7. Calling Memorial Day a “national holiday“ is a bit of a misnomer. While there are 10 federal holidays created by Congress—including Memorial Day—they apply only to Federal employees and the District of Columbia. Federal Memorial Day, established in 1888, allowed Civil War veterans, many of whom were drawing a government paycheck, to honor their fallen comrades without being docked a day’s pay. For the rest of us, our holidays were enacted state by state.

8. May 30th was originally designated for the commemoration of Memorial Day. The 30th of May was chosen since this was a day that flowers all over the country were in bloom. Since then the date has been changed to the last Monday of May, and 2016 is only the 7th time Memorial Day has been celebrated on May 30th since it was changed in 1971.

9. The first large federal observance occurred at Arlington in 1868. After the war, the former home of Confederate General Robert E. Lee became a cemetery to bury the nation’s dead. During a ceremony, children of the Soldier’s and Sailors’ Home and members of the Grand Army of the Republic walked through the cemetery singing hymn and reciting poetry while strewing flowers on the graves, reports Veterans Affairs.

10. There have been approximately 1,243,980 American casualties of War or Military Action since the Civil War.

U.S. War Casualties By Conflict:
Civil War –
Approximately 620,000 Americans died. The Union lost almost 365,000 troops and the Confederacy about 260,000. More than half of these deaths were caused by disease.
World War I116,516 Americans died, more than half from disease.
World War II405,399 Americans died.
Korean War 36,574 Americans died.
Vietnam Conflict58,220 Americans died.
Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm383 U.S. service members died.
Operation Iraqi Freedom4,424 U.S. service members died.
Operation New Dawn 73 U.S. service members died.
Operation Enduring Freedom2,349 U.S. service members died.
Freedom’s Sentinel Casualties – 22 U.S. service members have died as of May 2016.
Inherent Resolve Totals – 20 U.S. service members have died as of May 2016.


How do you plan to honor our fallen service members as you celebrate the Memorial Day holiday?

 

Post updated from article originally published in 2015 by Inquisitr.com
better together puzzle picture

Better Together: Colorado VNA Merges with RVNA

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Chris Lee (Colorado VNA CEO) and Lori Follett (Vice President and Chief Business Development Officer)

Colorado Visiting Nurse Association (Colorado VNA) and Northern Colorado’s Rehabilitation & Visiting Nurse Association (RVNA) have officially merged their operations effective May 1st after a year of board discussions and a final vote of approval back in February.

Founded in 1889, Colorado VNA began as a Denver-based charity care organization and has expanded to provide a full continuum of care to individuals and families in 15 Front Range counties. RVNA has provided home health, home making, and wellness services to Larimer and Weld county residents for almost 37 years.

This merger comes at a crucial time for our two organizations as we work to ensure our future success in this ever-changing healthcare environment. Both of our agencies have a long history of serving our respective communities and both have a stellar reputation for clinical excellence,” states Colorado VNA CEO Chris Lee. “Patients across the Front Range will benefit from organizational synergies and a shared commitment from all of our employees to provide the highest quality and most compassionate care.”

Colorado VNA Director of Human Resources, Brenda Garrett, adds, “By centralizing the back office administration in Denver we can focus on expanding our services throughout our entire service area, but especially in Northern Colorado’s rural communities. The combined Colorado Visiting Nurse Association will have over 500 employees and plans to grow services that will create additional talent recruitment opportunities.”

In 2015, the two nonprofit agencies served a combined total of 29,000 patients with 268,000 care touchpoints. In addition, the agencies provided free-and reduced-cost health, wellness, and preventative care to more than 600 low-income households to help them maintain independence in their homes. Community wellness services such as flu immunizations, foot care clinics, and health education programs have also been cornerstones of both organizations. Colorado VNA is a 24 million dollar agency and with the merger the combined agency is expected to be at 28 million dollars in revenue.

Rehabilitation and Visiting Nurse Association will change its name to Colorado VNA Northern Colorado Division but operations and personnel will remain the same in the Greeley office. Current RVNA CEO, Lori Follett, will transition into her new position as Vice President and Chief Business Development Officer. “I am excited to see this partnership come to fruition as our patients, partners and employees will undoubtedly reap the benefits of improved processes and technologies. This collaboration is truly a win-win for everyone involved.”

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About Colorado VNA
Colorado Visiting Nurse Association (Colorado VNA) is a nonprofit, Medicare-certified home health organization founded in 1889. Its mission is to provide a continuum of health care in the home and community that supports optimal well-being, independence, and dignity. The organization’s comprehensive array of health services spans all levels of intensity of care for individuals, communities, and businesses. Colorado VNA has also developed innovative community programs to help seniors age-in-place. For more information, visit www.VNAColorado.org.